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2011 Lyme & TBD Abstracts  - ARCHIVE

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J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2011 Feb 2;93(3):252-60.

Lyme arthritis in children presenting with joint effusions.
Milewski MD, Cruz AI Jr, Miller CP, Peterson AT, Smith BG.


Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8071, USA. mdmilewski@gmail.com

BACKGROUND:
The present study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of Lyme arthritis in children who had a joint aspiration at a tertiary care children's hospital in an endemic area and to identify clinical factors useful to differentiate Lyme arthritis from septic arthritis at the time of the initial presentation.

METHODS:
The records of all children with an age of eighteen years or less who were managed with aspiration for joint effusions at our institution from 1992 to 2009 were reviewed. Data collection included a review of aspirates; an analysis of cell count, culture results, and hematological inflammatory markers; and a review of surgical intervention.

RESULTS:
A total of 506 joint aspirations were analyzed. One hundred and fifteen aspirations were excluded. In the remaining group of 391 patients, 123 (31%) were subsequently diagnosed with Lyme arthritis. Fifty-one patients had culture-positive septic arthritis. The two cohorts were significantly different in terms of the presence of a fever of >101.5°F (>40.6°C) at the time of presentation, the refusal to bear weight, the peripheral white blood-cell count, and joint fluid cell count. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the C-reactive protein level were not significantly different between the two cohorts. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that refusal to bear weight was the strongest predictor of the diagnosis of septic arthritis over Lyme arthritis.

CONCLUSIONS:
For any child presenting with a joint effusion in a Lyme-endemic area of the Northeastern United States, the likely prevalence of Lyme arthritis is 31% overall and 45% in the presence of knee effusion. Children with joint effusions resulting from Lyme disease are more likely to have knee involvement, a lower peripheral white blood-cell count, and a lower joint fluid cell count, and they are less likely to have fever or complete refusal to bear weight, when compared with children with septic arthritis.

 


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Cardiol J. 2011;18(1):63-6.

Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome following Lyme disease.
Kanjwal K, Karabin B, Kanjwal Y, Grubb BP.


Section of Electrophysiology, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine,The University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, USA.


BACKGROUND:
A subgroup of patients suffering from Lyme disease (LD) may initially respond to antibiotics only to later develop a syndrome of fatigue, joint pain and cognitive dysfunction referred to as 'post treatment LD syndrome'. We report on a series of patients who developed autonomic dysfunction in the form of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS).

METHODS:
All of the patients in this report had suffered from LD in the past and were successfully treated with antibiotics. All patients were apparently well, until years later when they presented with fatigue, cognitive dysfunction and orthostatic intolerance. These patients were diagnosed with POTS on the basis of clinical features and results of the tilt table (HUTT) testing.

RESULTS:
Five patients (all women), aged 22-44 years, were identified for inclusion in this study. These patients developed symptoms of fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, orthostatic palpitations and either near syncope or frank syncope. The debilitating nature of these symptoms had resulted in lost of the employment or inability to attend school. Three patients were also suffering from migraine, two from anxiety and depression and one from hypertension. All patients demonstrated a good response to the employed treatment. Four of the five were able to engage in their activities of daily living and either resumed employment or returned to school.

CONCLUSIONS:
In an appropriate clinical setting, evaluation for POTS in patients suffering from post LD syndrome may lead to early recognition and treatment, with subsequent improvement in symptoms of orthostatic intolerance.

 


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