Current Research Studies

  • Why do some individuals continue to experience chronic symptoms of Lyme Disease, such as pain, fatigue, sensory hypersensitivity, and neurocognitive difficulties long after receiving treatment? Through the use of brain imaging (functional MRI) and specific biomarker testing, we hope to gain a better understanding as to why patients develop this persistent, debilitating pain. Based on prior research, we suspect that Lyme disease may change the pattern of an individual's brain activation, making him or her more sensitive to pain than a healthy person.
  • Are you suffering from chronic fatigue that began after you were diagnosed and treated with antibiotics for Lyme Disease? This new treatment research study investigates whether disulfiram, commonly known as "Antabuse", has the potential to be used as a treatment option for patients experiencing chronic post-treatment Lyme symptoms. This well-known, FDA approved drug is currently used to help individuals with alcohol dependence resist consumption; however, new scientific research has demonstrated that disulfiram is a potent killer of the Lyme bacteria in the laboratory setting.
  • This long-term goal of this study is to reduce the number of patients who develop symptoms of chronic Lyme disease (also known as Post-treatment Lyme Syndrome) by identifying better tests and by understanding the immunologic, rheumatologic, and neurologic impact of this illness over time. This can only be done by comparing those patients who recover fully to those who experience ongoing symptoms, as well as to healthy controls. Healthy participants complete two visits to our center.
  • We are recruiting healthy volunteers to participate in our diagnostic brain imaging study. This new study aims to investigate individuals experiencing persistent pain that was triggered by Lyme Disease. By utilizing brain imaging (functional MRI), we hope to gain a better understanding of why patients have ongoing problems with persistent pain, fatigue, and sensory sensitivity even after antibiotic treatment. We suspect that Lyme disease may change the pattern of an individual's brain activation, making him or her more sensitive to pain than a healthy person.